National Cancer InstituteU.S. National Institutes of Healthwww.cancer.gov
Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities logo

2013 Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer

2013 Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer Background Information

The American Cancer Society (ACS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) collaborate annually to provide updates on cancer incidence and death rates, and trends in these outcomes for the U.S. This year's report includes a special focus on incidence trends for human papillomavirus (HPV)–associated cancers and HPV vaccination. The Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2009, shows that overall cancer death rates continued to decline in the U.S.

Excerpted Statistics on Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic and Underserved Populations



Overall Cancer Incidence

  • During the period from 2000 to 2009, incidence rates for all cancers combined declined among men of each racial/ethnic group, although the decrease was not statistically significant for American Indian/Alaska Native(AI/AN) men.
  • During the period from 2000 to 2009, overall cancer death rates declined among men and women of all racial/ethnic groups by 1.5% per year, although the decrease in AI/AN individuals was not significant. During the period from 2000 to 2009, overall cancer death rates declined among children aged 0 to 19 years in all racial/ethnic groups by 2% per year, although the decrease in AI/AN children was not significant.
  • Among men, blacks had the highest overall cancer incidence rate of any racial/ethnic group during the period from 2005 to 2009.
  • Among women, whites followed by blacks had the highest overall cancer incidence rates during the period from 2005 to 2009.
  • Incidence rates of all cancers combined among women decreased only in whites and Hispanics.
  • Childhood cancer incidence rates among those aged 0 to 19 years increased for black and Hispanic children but were stable for children of all other racial and ethnic groups; however, blacks had the lowest rates of any racial and ethnic group.
  • Among men, the highest incidence rates were observed for prostate cancer, followed by lung and colorectal cancer in each racial and ethnic group, except for Hispanics, in whom colorectal cancer ranked second. Among women, breast cancer generally had the highest incidence rate, followed by lung and colorectal cancers, except among Asian and Pacific Islander (API) and Hispanic women, in whom colorectal cancer was more common than lung cancer.
  • Beyond the three most commonly diagnosed cancers for men and four most commonly diagnosed cancers for women, cancer ranking varied by race and ethnicity.



Breast Cancer

  • Breast cancer incidence rates declined during the period from 2000 to 2009 among white women but increased among black and API women and were stable among AI/AN and among Hispanic women; however, in the most recent 5-year period (2005–2009), rates were stable among women of all racial and ethnic groups.
  • Among women, death rates for breast cancer decreased in all racial and ethnic groups, except among AI/AN women.



Colorectal Cancer

  • Colorectal cancer incidence rates from 2000 to 2009 decreased among both men and women of every racial and ethnic group, although these decreases were not statistically significant for AI/AN men or women.
  • Among men and women, death rates for colorectal cancer decreased in all racial and ethnic groups, except among AI/AN men and women, in whom the decreases were not statistically significant.



Lung Cancer

  • Lung cancer incidence rates from 2000 to 2009 declined in men and were stable among women of all racial and ethnic groups, although rates decreased among all women from 2005 to 2009.
  • Among men and women, death rates from 2000 to 2009 for lung cancer decreased in all racial and ethnic groups, except among AI/AN men and women and API women, in whom the decreases for lung cancer were not statistically significant.



Prostate Cancer

  • Prostate cancer incidence rates declined among men of all racial and ethnic groups from 2000 to 2009.
  • Among men, death rates for prostate cancer decreased in all racial and ethnic groups from 2000 to 2009.



Uterine Cancer

  • Uterine cancer ranked fourth among women of each racial and ethnic group except API women, in whom thyroid cancer was the fourth most common cancer.
  • Uterine cancer incidence rates increased among women of all racial and ethnic groups, although increases were not statistically significant among white and AI/AN women.



Liver Cancer

  • Liver cancer incidence rates increased among white, black, AI/AN, and Hispanic men and among white, black, and Hispanic women.
  • Death rates for liver cancer increased in white, black, and Hispanic men and among white and Hispanic women. Death rates decreased among API men and women.



Pancreatic Cancer

  • Pancreatic cancer incidence rates increased only among white men and women and black men.
  • Pancreatic death rates increased among white men and women and API men, but were stable among the other populations.



Kidney Cancer

  • Kidney cancer incidence rates increased among men and women of every racial and ethnic group.



Thyroid Cancer

  • Thyroid cancer incidence rates increased among men and women of every racial and ethnic group, except among AI/AN men.



Melanoma Cancer

  • Melanoma death rates increased only among white men.



HPV-Associated Cancers

Cervical
  • Incidence rates for cervical cancer declined in women in all racial/ethnic groups except AI/AN women.
  • Among women, the highest incidence rate from 2005 to 2009 for cervical cancer was in Hispanics. The lowest incidence was among API women.
  • Cervical cancer incidence rates were markedly elevated among most women living in low socioeconomic areas.

Vulvar
  • Among women, the highest incidence rate from 2005 to 2009 for vulvar cancers was in whites. The lowest incidence was among API women.
  • From 2000-2009 incidence rates increased among white and black women. Increases in incidence rates were generally larger among persons aged 55-64 years than among younger or older individuals.

Vaginal
  • Among women, the highest incidence rate from 2005 to 2009 for vaginal cancer was in blacks. The lowest incidence was among AI/AN women.
  • Vaginal cancer incidence decreased among black women.

Penile
  • Penile cancer incidence rates were unchanged among men in all racial/ethnic groups.
  • Penile cancer incidence rates were markedly elevated among most men living in low socioeconomic areas.

Anal
  • Among men, the highest incidence rate from 2005 to 2009 for anal cancer was in blacks. The lowest incidence was among API men.
  • Anal cancer incidence rates were markedly elevated among most men living in low socioeconomic areas.
  • Among women, the highest incidence rate from 2005 to 2009 for anal cancer was in whites.
  • From 2000-2009 incidence rates increased among white and black men and women. Increases in incidence rates were generally larger among persons aged 55-64 years than among younger or older individuals.

Oropharyngeal
  • Incidence rates from 2005 to 2009 were highest among white and black men and women.
  • From 2000-2009 incidence rates increased among white men and women. Increases in incidence rates were generally larger among persons aged 55-64 years than among younger or older individuals.



HPV Vaccination Coverage

  • Virtually all sociodemographic groups showed statistically significant increases in one or more–dose and three-dose coverage and series completion rates for HPV vaccination from 2008 to 2010, although not all the increases were statistically significant.
  • In 2010, HPV vaccination coverage with one or more doses and three doses, as well as series completion, increased with age.
  • Hispanics were statistically significantly more likely than non-Hispanic whites to have received one or more HPV vaccine doses by 2010.
  • Girls who were Vaccines for Children Program (VFC) eligible and insured were statistically significantly more likely than privately insured and VFC-eligible and uninsured girls to have received one or more HPV vaccine doses by 2010. Girls who were VFC-eligible and uninsured were also significantly less likely than privately insured girls to have received 3 doses of HPV vaccine by 2010.
  • Among girls who initiated the series, Hispanics were statistically significantly less likely than non-Hispanic whites, those living below the poverty level were statistically significantly less likely than those living above the poverty level, and the privately insured were statistically significantly more likely than VFC-eligible and insured girls and VFC-eligible and uninsured girls to complete the three-dose series by 2010.



Pap Test Prevalence

  • State-specific Pap test prevalence was generally low among women with no usual source of medical care or health insurance.
  • Asian and Hispanic women aged 21 years and older had a lower prevalence of having had a Pap test in the past 3 years compared with non-Hispanic blacks and non-Hispanic whites.




Updated: 05/16/13